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Easter in Paris? – American Churches

April 14, 2017 @ 3:25 pm
posted by Sandra Sheridan
Paris France

American Church in Paris on quai d’Orsay

Throughout the Christian faith, Good Friday marks a somber beginning to a weekend that ends in hope and lily-filled celebrations on Easter Sunday. Traditionally, church bells throughout France fall silent from Maundy Thursday until Easter Sunday. With much of the French populace Roman Catholic, all of the cities, towns and villages have a church – many with a bell.   As Easter approaches, the somber reflection on Christ’s crucifixion and death is reflected in the quiet, and French parents tell their children – in fun – that the chimes have flown to Rome to see the Pope.

Easter Sunday – voila!  The celebrations of the Resurrection begin with the joyous pealing of the bells throughout the country. Lilies adorn the church, and Christians gather to rejoice that Christ ‘is risen indeed’.

One of many things we plan for our next trip to Paris is attending the American Church in Paris. The church offers a phenomenal gathering place for people of many denominations and interests. They offer traditional and contemporary liturgical services and host a number of specific interest groups. One, Bloom Where You are Planted, helps English-speaking newcomers settle in to their new life in Paris. Part of the church’s stated mission is “…to provide a place of English language worship in the American Protestant tradition, and to engage in ministries and services that enrich the lives of residents and visitors in Paris.

The first American church established outside of the United States, the ACP dates to 1814; though its official charter and sanctuary were established in 1857. Since 1931, the church has welcomed worshippers to the quai d’Orsay location along the Seine.

Not too far away on Avenue George V, the American Cathedral in Paris is a center of worship for English-speakers abroad. Permanent parishioners total about 400 and their numbers swell considerably with students, tourists and business persons in Paris on shorter-term assignments.

Appropriately, the Cathedral was consecrated on Thanksgiving Day in 1886, but its roots go back further to the days when American Episcopalians gathered for worship in the 1830s. The Cathedral serves as the “mother church” for the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, under the jurisdiction of the Episcopal Church in the United States.

Wherever you and your family will celebrate this season of renewal and joy, we wish you Peace and Hope for the days that lie ahead.

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