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The Promise of Paris – New E-book

April 28, 2017 @ 4:04 pm
posted by Sandra Sheridan

I know, I know.  I said I would launch on Monday in honor of Labor Day in France … but I’m kind of like that kid who can’t wait to give you your present 3 days before your birthday!  And then there’s the tendency of everyone to check out Facebook on the weekend.  In any case …. here ’tis!  I welcome your feedback!

By popular request, Fired Up for France:  The Promise of Paris E-book (pdf)

is now available!

3 Things You’ll Love about This E-book:

Easy-access, helpful planning guides and resource links 

Specific accommodation, dining, sightseeing and shopping information – computer and mobile device access, printable pdf – hyperlinks to dynamic Paris resources – Paris Tourist Office, Currency conversion, museums++

Fired Up for France: The Promise of Paris

Author Sandra Sheridan

Concrete tips & authentic information – delivered with warmth & humor!

Neighborhoods, cafes, flea markets, markets and fun excursions with captivating anecdotes
and real-life experiences – even wedding ideas – fabulous photos to whet your appetite for Paris

Inspires you to set aside your fears and take action!

The author eases the angst of travel planning and ignites your hunger for Paris.                   Every word is designed to move you from dreaming of a Paris trip to making it a                     reality to cherish for a lifetime.




$4.95    Special Introductory Price   (Today thru May 7 only)

Top Customer Reviews

The Promise of Paris

A super informative book!  For some years now I have been making the trip to Paris & staying at “My Little Home in Paris” in the Latin Quarter.  I came across your amazing book, while staying at the apartment …and just wanted to tell you what a super informative book it is.   Having been to so many of these places, I feel you have captured them to perfection.  Thank you again for the wonderful book on Paris.
Paris comes off the page and into the heart in this gem of a travel book
 
 After reading The Promise of Paris, I was ready to abandon tasks at hand and board a plane for France. This charming volume provides the first-time visitor, as well as the most experienced traveler to Paris, insight into off-the-tourist-beat places to eat, shop, sight-see and museum-visit. For the arm chair traveler, the intriguing photos of people, buildings and items on display in shops make owning a copy of the book worthwhile.
Erase any fears or hesitation ….Manages to erase any fears or hesitations you may have about visiting Paris – language barriers, negotiating the metro, where to eat, where to stay, etc. – and provides you with just the right amount of information needed – down-to-earth and easy to digest and embrace.  She helps you feel ‘at home’ in Paris, before your trip has begun! Most of all, she invites you to have your own experience, to discover the Paris of your dreams….Inspires you to take the plunge, make the trip, and discover for yourself the magic of Paris that keeps calling her back.
Easy to read – this book will prepare you for Paris  This book will prepare you for Paris, so that you can blend in like a long-term resident instead of a tourist. It is like a good Parisian friend meeting you for coffee at a sidewalk cafe – effortless and amusing way to brush up on the City of Lights.
Fresh and original! Just what the world needs: another Paris guidebook!  Sandra Sheridan’s book is NOT a guide book, nor does it pretend to be.  It’s fresh and original and motivates and inspires those who have always dreamed of seeing Paris but keep putting it off, or who have been meaning to return ‘one day’ … to do it!  I was struck by the honesty of the book – or should I say of its author.
Accompany the author on her frolics through Paris Through her exuberance for everything French, the author invites you to accompany her on her frolics through Paris.  Her book weaves and wanders with great delight through the narrow cobblestone streets and the grand avenues of the 20 districts that make up Paris, taking a ‘wrong’ turn and finding yourself happily lost in paradise.  Discover quiet, hidden neighborhoods close to the bustle of the city, art, architecture, artisanal crafts, monuments, museums, history, culture, cuisine, practical info and tons of ambiance, spiced with captivating anecdotes straight from the heart.

 




Paperback still available and on sale in connection with the E-book launch.
Paris France travel
Special France Fanatics’ sale:$14.95 (+tax & $3 shipping)  Signed copy

Paperback print on demand – 128 pages – allow 10 days for shipping.

Don’t hesitate to contact S. Sheridan with questions or specific requests!

Auguste Rodin – in Paris and Meudon

April 17, 2017 @ 9:00 pm
posted by Sandra Sheridan
Auguste Rodin Museum in Paris France

Grand windows, soft light and Rodin’s masterful works

I choose a block of marble and chop off whatever I don’t need. ~ Auguste Rodin

Sculpture draws me, as if it wraps a silk scarf about my waist and tugs ever so gently, until I come into the fold. Naturally, Musée Rodin topped my initial list of things to do and see in Paris. But this museum eluded me. First visit – closed. Second visit – a minor ‘strike’. Third visit – a friend’s wallet went missing, before we ever arrived.

Finally, I was able to step into the mansion and through the gardens. The museum is housed in the magnificent 18th-century hôtel particulier known today as Hôtel Biron. Officially opened in 1919, the museum and all of Rodin’s works in plaster, marble, bronze and stone, as well as all of his drawings were given by Rodin to the French nation. What a miracle of time and preservation to be able to see the alabaster marble figures, to fathom the birth of sculpture from sketches and paintings.

And, then, to walk among the garden figures – the shy and shame-filled figures of Adam and Eve, the Gates of Hell and – bien sur! – The Thinker. My husband and I retraced my original steps during a recent visit. Time had taken no edge from the spectacular beauty of Rodin’s works, but we did notice the march of time and tourists over patched parquet floors and well-worn walls.

Paris musee rodin

Pleasant moments in the garden cafe

We were delighted to see that a 16-million Euro restoration took place from 2012 to 2015, restoring the lovely mansion, opening new visiting rooms and renewing the museography of Rodin’s collections.  One of the most exciting changes was the redesign of its interior to reveal the creative development of Rodin’s work and that of some of his contemporaries, including Camille Claudel.  Visitors now literally see can trace the works’ movement from plaster to completion in bronze or marble.  For the first time, we see the sculptor’s genius evolve.

Villa des Brillants, Auguste Rodin's home in Meudon

Villa des Brillants, Meudon

On our return to Paris, we definitely will spend a morning at this lovely museum and end our visit with lunch in the garden.  Just imagine – the wonder of visiting Rodin’s enchanting home, immersing yourself in his work, wandering through the sculpture garden and lingering over lunch like privileged guests.

Sadly, there are no more extended evening hours, but no problem.  We would not miss this precious experience.  We also look to add to our experience with  the discovery of The Villa des Brillants, Rodin’s Meudon residence and studios, where he lived with and later married Rose Beurret. They are buried here in Meudon, their tomb dominated by an imposing, full-size copy of The Thinker.

I really can’t help but compare the cost of this dual experience of museums – 13 Euros per person ($13.83) to the cost in Orlando for a movie or museum.  Incomparable – and one of the many reasons Paris spoils us!

Copyright © 2005-2017, LuxeEuro, LLC. Photo and text, all rights reserved

Easter in Paris? – American Churches

April 14, 2017 @ 3:25 pm
posted by Sandra Sheridan
Paris France

American Church in Paris on quai d’Orsay

Throughout the Christian faith, Good Friday marks a somber beginning to a weekend that ends in hope and lily-filled celebrations on Easter Sunday. Traditionally, church bells throughout France fall silent from Maundy Thursday until Easter Sunday. With much of the French populace Roman Catholic, all of the cities, towns and villages have a church – many with a bell.   As Easter approaches, the somber reflection on Christ’s crucifixion and death is reflected in the quiet, and French parents tell their children – in fun – that the chimes have flown to Rome to see the Pope.

Easter Sunday – voila!  The celebrations of the Resurrection begin with the joyous pealing of the bells throughout the country. Lilies adorn the church, and Christians gather to rejoice that Christ ‘is risen indeed’.

One of many things we plan for our next trip to Paris is attending the American Church in Paris. The church offers a phenomenal gathering place for people of many denominations and interests. They offer traditional and contemporary liturgical services and host a number of specific interest groups. One, Bloom Where You are Planted, helps English-speaking newcomers settle in to their new life in Paris. Part of the church’s stated mission is “…to provide a place of English language worship in the American Protestant tradition, and to engage in ministries and services that enrich the lives of residents and visitors in Paris.

The first American church established outside of the United States, the ACP dates to 1814; though its official charter and sanctuary were established in 1857. Since 1931, the church has welcomed worshippers to the quai d’Orsay location along the Seine.

Not too far away on Avenue George V, the American Cathedral in Paris is a center of worship for English-speakers abroad. Permanent parishioners total about 400 and their numbers swell considerably with students, tourists and business persons in Paris on shorter-term assignments.

Appropriately, the Cathedral was consecrated on Thanksgiving Day in 1886, but its roots go back further to the days when American Episcopalians gathered for worship in the 1830s. The Cathedral serves as the “mother church” for the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe, under the jurisdiction of the Episcopal Church in the United States.

Wherever you and your family will celebrate this season of renewal and joy, we wish you Peace and Hope for the days that lie ahead.

href=”mailto:swsheridan@luxeeuro.com”>We’d love to hear from you!

Copyright © 2005-2017, LuxeEuro, LLC. Photo and text, all rights reserved

Picard Gourmet Frozen Food

April 5, 2017 @ 6:13 pm
posted by Sandra Sheridan
Paris frozen foods

A surprising and vast collection of frozen foods

Vraiment, leave it to the French to offer decidedly upscale choices in frozen food.  Several times we have walked past these Parisian stores with a mere glance in their direction, apparently without enough curiosity to take a closer look. I’m talking about Picard Les Surgelés, and I must steal a phrase from someone else who penned a word or two about this chain.  They likened the store to a cryogenics laboratory – not, mind you, that I’ve been to such a lab – and the reference seems to capture the cool exterior, relative lack of color, fluorescent lighting and refrigerated cases along the walls.

Then someone in our delightful “France Fanatics” Facebook group, stepped out with the question: “Has anyone else who travels to France found Picard great in a pinch, or am I alone on this?”  As with every other French-related question in this 2,000-member group of Francophiles, candid and enthusiastic responses poured through Mr. Zuckerberg’s gates.

The comments ranged from ‘very good products’ and ‘In the US, the closest thing … is probably Trader Joes’ to ‘the French homemaker’s best friend’ and ‘Everything was delicious!’  As I probed further, I found that the company was founded in 1906, is headquartered in Fontainebleau, and now has 1,000 stores in France and has expanded to Belgium, Italy, Switzerland, and Sweden.

So why all the excitement?  How are they different from Marie Callender, Stouffer’s or other prominent frozen food brands in the United States?  Well, I think the dominant differences are quite impressive – like raising their très haute offerings well beyond mac ‘n cheese and chicken pot pies to include an enticing collection of French recipes as well as fresh-frozen, unenchanced ingredients like fruits, vegetables, meat and poultry.

Picard frozen foods of france

Chicken and asparagus – delicieux!

Let’s try a sampling, shall we?  How about Basque chicken or a savory potato-ham-Emmentaler cheese dish, saumon en croute or barbeque ribs?  Add lovely desserts – even coffee éclairs, starters and even some essentials like minced shallots, chopped herbes and a variety of sauces from Thai curry to beurre blanc.  With over 1,200 products, the range is pretty magnificent and even downright exotic – peeled chestnuts and pumpkin purée, to name a couple.

Especially appealing is the care that goes into production and distribution. Tapping into the deeply-rooted food culture of France, Picard stays close to farmers and other food producers to tap high quality sources – fully 67% of their products originate in France, where pesticide and fertilizer use is strictly limited.  Production standards are precise and rigorous; and the company controls every aspect of production, ensuring adherence to required temperatures and avoiding the need for additives and preservatives.

Shoppers utilize large, insulated bags to maintain those proper temperatures en route to their homes.  Not surprisingly, the French ranked Picard their favorite brand a couple of years ago, and it fails to be a well-guarded secret that Picard is well represented at many dinner parties.

I’m convinced.  Next trip, for the occasional at-home meal, we’ll stop in at Picard Surgelés.  I imagine we will start with the molten chocolate cake, apparently quite the favorite with over two million purchased per year!

 We’d love to hear from you!

Copyright © 2005-2017, LuxeEuro, LLC. Photo and text, all rights reserved